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Please join us Saturday October 1 at 7pm for the opening reception for Forget Them.

The works from 33 artists and collectives will be on view for BKMW’s 4th annual juried exhibition. Forget Them will be on view through November 27. 

Participating artists: Ancient Truth Investigators, Andy LowrieÅsa Elmstam, Black Adept, Carina Shoshtary, Danielle Embry, Elisabeth Scheller, Emily Blodgett-Panos, Emily Culver, Emily Grego, Erica Bello, Holland Houdek, Jaesung Lee, Julia Walter, Karen Vanmol, Lauren Kalman, Lissy Selvius, Maggie Willsey, Marion Delarue, Matt Lambert, Maureen Duffy, Melissa Cameron & Jill Hermans, Mi-Sook Hur, Nadine Simone Kuffner, Nicole Polentas, Rhea Vedro, Rob McKirdie, RIMA, Sharon Massey, Sin-TituloSofia Bjorkman, Vivienne Varay, WALKA Studio

 

Talismans, amulets, shrines, and charms that have been created to wear, carry, or look upon. These objects convey a specific power, intend to protect against superstition, or commemorate.

This exhibition is inspired by a quote from the only surviving poem by Lucretius (c. 99 – c. 55 BCE) – On the Nature of Things.

“There are no angels, demons, or ghosts. Immaterial spirits of any kind do not exist….Forget them.”

Yet it seems that despite our best efforts, we can’t. This show examines humankind’s perennial struggle between personal autonomy and spiritual guidance, and how these ideas manifest and inspire the fabrication of physical objects.

All cultures throughout the ages have taken abstract concepts like gods, demons, imps, and spirits and translated them into material items that are often housed in esteemed spaces. Shrines that celebrate, amulets that protect, and totems that commemorate these enduring theologies and phenomenons. Perhaps the most resilient form of piety, the belief that objects imbued with spiritual reverence might protect or reward the owner withstands the test of time, often despite our better judgment.

“There are no angels, demons, or ghosts. Immaterial spirits of any kind do not exist. The creatures with which the Greek and Roman imagination populated the world—Fates, harpies, demons, genii, nymphs, satyrs, dryads, celestial messengers, and the spirits of the dead—are entirely unreal. Forget them.” – Lucretius

Jurors: Steven Gordon Holman, Brian Weissman, Erin S. Daily