The ring is taken. She is taken with the ring. The ring is her.

The process is taken. She is taken with the process. The process is her.

The lesson is taken. She is taken with the lesson. The lesson is her.

The object is taken. She is taken with the object. The object is her.

The world is taken. She is taken with the world. The world is her.

The nature is taken. She is taken with the nature. The nature is her.

The material is taken. She is taken with the material. The material is her.

The journey is taken. She is taken with the journey. The journey is her.

The love is taken. She is taken with the love. The love is her.

The hate is taken. She is taken with the hate. The hate is her.

The machine is taken. She is taken with the machine. The machine is her.

The self is taken. She is taken with the self. The self is her.

The value is taken. She is taken with the value. The value is her.

The influence is taken. She is taken with the influence. The influence is her.

The gem is taken. She is taken with the gem. The gem is her.

The work is taken. She is taken with the work. The work is her.   

 

TAKEN, which highlights the immersive processes that are the origins of this jewelry work.

Featuring the work of 7 artists from the RISD jewelry + metalsmithing graduate department.

 

Iris Han has taken traditional stone setting in a revolutionary direction. She introduces an unconventional system of value that considers vulnerability, color diversity, and openness.

Heesu Kim considers how love and hate are unconsciously taken. In nature Heesu finds examples of resilience, and learns lessons about slowing down and connecting with her surroundings. Her work pays tribute to this force.

Chubai Liu is (re)defining and questioning the existence of the self through physical works made by the self. She considers ways the human and mechanical have taken over each and become hybridized.

Molly Palecek brings together methods and motifs taken from different fields. In her work, sacred architecture, algorithms from digital fabrication, and jewelry forms and techniques intermingle, growing into and out of each other.

Neta Ron makes as a process of healing and recharging. When Neta is taken with her process, when she stops monitoring her making through the exterior world, she is freed from worry; the work comes through her fingers and is resolved.

Yue Tan is taken with the texture and quality of the woods, where the scene varies from each difference angle. She builds connections between yarn and wood, using contrasting materials to share the atmosphere of the forest.

MJ Tyson works with objects taken from their roles in the world. She destroys and reworks the captured objects into transmissions that tell of multiple generations.

 

On view In the Gallery at Brooklyn Metal Works June 25 – July 30.

Opening reception with the artists June 24 at 7pm.

Please join us!

 

Iris Han

Heesu Kim Photo Credit Azur Mele

Chubai Liu

Neta Ron

Neta Ron

Molly Palecek

Yu Tan

MJ Tyson